Social Program

Conference Excursions and Tours

In addition to the scientific program, there will be a number of excursion tours. All of the excursions are in the immediate Hobart area to avoid long travel times between the conference venue and the destinations. These activities are in the process of being finalised; the information below is only preliminary at this stage. Full details will be supplied in the second announcement and updated here.

1. Museum of Old and New Art (MONA)


MONA is an unconventional privately funded museum that and has become a must-see Australian attraction. Created by mathematician and art collector, David Walsh, the museum is carved into cliffs on the bank of the Derwent River in Hobart and spans three floors showcasing a huge collection.

You will travel to MONA by ferry (about 30 minutes along the Derwent River) and return via the MONA bus. You will be under cover on the ferry.

See http://www.mona.net.au/

Being prepared: warm clothes and an umbrella for the short walks between the ferry/bus and the museum are advisable.

Museum of Old and New Art (MONA)

2. Mount Field National Park

Participants will travel by bus to Mt Field National Park which is just over one hour’s drive from Hobart. The park offers walks through a diversity of temperate rainforest vegetation including tree ferns and swamp gums as well as alpine vegetation at higher altitudes and offers a showcase of some of Tasmania’s most pristine natural beauty at its finest! The majestic Russell Falls at Tasmania’s Mt Field National Park is a geographic marvel that is also Tasmania’s oldest national park. The surrounding region is under protection for preserving its beauty and has been dating back to 1885 when it was named Tasmania’s first natural reserve. A wide variety of wildlife can be found in the area that is native to Tasmania including wombats, platypus, bandicoots, echidnas and the Tasmanian devil. Travel past iconic Mount Wellington, follow the Derwent River, feed trout at the Salmon Ponds, journey into the rainforests of Mt Field National Park and culminate it all with the tumbling, cascading spectacle of Russell Falls. This is one of Hobart’s most scenic day tours. The park is part of the approximately 40% of Tasmania that is protected in national parks.

Find out more at http://www.discovertasmania.com.au/about/national-parks-and-wilderness/mt-field-national-park

Being prepared: come prepared for cool weather and possible rain, including appropriate footwear for wet and possibly muddy ground. Maximum daytime temperatures at Russell Falls in July are between 10.9⁰C and 12.1⁰C but can feel a little cooler if it is windy. Rain or showers are reasonably likely.

Russell Falls

3. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary

Bonorong is a sanctuary for Tasmanian wildlife located just north of Hobart in Brighton. Animals unique to Tasmania include the Tasmanian Devil, The Eastern quoll, Tasmanian pademelon, and bettong. Bonorong Wildlife Sanctuary provides an opportunity to see all of these animals as well as possums, potoroos, wombats, echidnas and emus. Guides will tell you about the animals and you may even be able to pat some.

Find out more at http://bonorong.com.au/.

Being prepared: come prepared for cool weather and possible rain, including appropriate footwear for wet and possibly muddy ground. Maximum daytime temperatures at Brighton in July are between 10.9⁰C and 12.1⁰C but can feel a little cooler if it is windy.

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4. Port Arthur

Port Arthur is located at the southern end of the Tasman Peninsula, 90 minutes’ drive south east of Hobart. The drive along the Tasman and Arthur Highways forms part of the Convict Trail Touring Route and takes in breathtaking seascapes, passing 5through rolling farmlands and little villages, past vineyards, artist studios and sweeping bays.

On arrival at Port Arthur, experience a 45 minute introduction to Port Arthur guided walking tour, wander around more than 30 historic buildings, ruins, gardens and museum houses and enjoy a 30 minute harbour cruise aboard the MV Marana.

For more information, see http://www.portarthur.org.au/index.aspx?base=1324

Being prepared: come prepared for cool weather and possible rain, including appropriate footwear for wet and possibly muddy ground. Maximum daytime temperatures at Port Arthur in July are between 10.9⁰C and 12.1⁰C but can feel a little cooler if it is windy.

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5. Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery and Lark Whisky Distillery

The recently renovated Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery is located in the CBD and combines a museum, art gallery and herbarium. It collects and conserves historical and scientific items as evidence of Tasmania’s cultural heritage and biodiversity including photographs, geological and zoological specimens, and example of decorative arts illustrating Tasmania’s colonial history. More information is available at http://www.tmag.tas.gov.au/home.

The Lark Distillery, located on Hobart’s waterfront, contributes to Tasmania’s growing reputation as a producer of high quality single malt whisky. Hear about the history of Lark Distillery and enjoy a tasting of four Tasmanian whiskies.

For more see http://www.larkdistillery.com.au/.

Being prepared: warm clothes and an umbrella for the short walks to, from, and between the museum and the distillery are advisable.

 

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Pre- and Post-Conference Tour Options

No specific tours have been organised but Tasmania provides a wealth of possibilities for tours. Tasmania is beautiful at any time of the year and offers a range of activities to suit a variety of interest, adventure, and activity levels. You might like to visit Port Arthur, the site of one of the most famous early convict settlements in Australia, or visit the beautiful Wineglass Bay and the Freycinet Peninsula – the walk into Wineglass Bay is worth doing and is not badly affected by winter weather. At this time of year there will be snow in the high country but Cradle Mountain is always spectacular. Over a third of Tasmania is National Park, Reserve or World Heritage protected wilderness. There are some famous multi-day walks such as the Overland track and the South Coast track, though at this time of year they would not be advised due to snow and winter conditions.

Tasmania has excellent food and there are tours which visit some excellent producers. South of Hobart, for instance, there is the Apple Barn which produces its own cider and serves good organic local food and produce – Tasmania is known as the “Apple Isle” and the Huon area south of Hobart is a strong orchard region. The estuary of the Derwent and the D’Entrecasteaux Channel provide many opportunities for coastal exploration and Bruny Island to the south of Hobart is worth a visit. Often dolphins accompany the ferry as it crosses to the island. There is also opportunity from the island for a sea trip to see the seals and other marine life on the south of Bruny Island. Launceston, the second largest population area, is about 2½ hours drive north from Hobart. It also has many attractions. The Gorge in Launceston is beautiful and a walk along the Gorge and across the suspension bridge or over the chairlift is worth doing. The north-west and west coasts are further afield but offer many and varied attractions. Further information is available from Tourism Tasmania (website below).

The links below will help you to find something to suit your travel plans. Please bear in mind that Tasmania is like the TARDIS of Dr Who: much bigger on the inside than you expect from just looking at the map. Travel times and distances can be longer than you realise, and it is impossible to see even the best bits in under a week.

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Opening Reception

Details are in the process of being finalised.

Dance Club

As at all PME conferences, there will likely be dancing.